Why the Juno-60 sounds different from the Juno-106

Roland Juno 106 with Juno 60

Dave Cornutt has a pretty detailed blog entry detailing why the Juno-60 is perceived by many to sound different than the Juno-106.

The jury’s still out as far as I’m concerned, but it’s an interesting read for the techie vintage synth geeks among us!

Click here to see his blog, “Sequence 15.”

Thanks for the insight, Dave!

Nerdy Facts About The Roland Jupiter Line


Some cold, hard facts about which models sound the same, which ones don’t, and why.

Super Jupiter / Jupiter-6 / Jupiter-8 Comparison

Sounds of the Super Jupiter vs. the Jupiter-80 emulation (with blind listening test)

Clusterchord’s synth demo page – SUPER JUPITER rev.4

Vintage Synth Ownership: A Labour of Love.

My recent acquisitions are a Roland Juno-106 and a Korg Poly-800II, both in excellent condition. Instant gratification. Not too shabby.

But sometimes a synth requires more nurturing. Sometimes crazy people like us even document their restorations for the world to see.

Moog Opus 3: 20 years in a damp basement

A Moog Opus 3 that was deserving of a better life.

Check out this picture-laden blog entry chronicling the resurrection of a Moog Opus 3. I find these types of blogs inspirational – they make me want to start documenting the stuff I do too.

I’ve done restoration work on a Yamaha CS40M, a Roland Jupiter-6, a couple of Roland Juno-106 keyboards, and a Korg DW-6000. Making a damaged or deteriorating instrument playable again is simply one of the most gratifying things a musician can do.